Once more with feeling

The Nature of Emotions: Pt. 1

As I sit here and prepare to work on another blog post a pile of school notes and old journals beckon me. While thumbing through them, a favorite book comes to mind (Silverstein, 1976). Within these piles of material are themes prevalent in my thinking that this book describes so succinctly. My own missing pieces are at first represented by deep wells of unresolved trauma which are the primary subject my old journals.

 

The Nature of Emotions: Pt. 2

As stated previously, the purpose of these posts is to sort through a somewhat disturbing grain of truth weaved throughout my inner emotional world. At the core of my greatest struggles is the realization that my emotional world is ripe with a paradoxical irony I can’t quite wrap my mind around. As someone who happens to be studying the field of psychology at the graduate level, I’m having trouble shaking these personal realizations. Human nature is – after all – at the core of my field of study. It would be ridiculous to study this stuff and not take time to apply it meaningfully to my own life wouldn’t it?


 

The Intelligence of Emotions

imageThroughout my studies, I have discovered interesting threads of belief woven throughout research seeking to define the nature of emotions. For example, a neurological perspective of emotions provides universal insights on the biological components in our brain responsible for the production and experience of feelings. In contrast, a social sciences perspective can help us understand unique variants in emotional expression and experience within individuals and across cultures. My question is, how accurate are these divergent theories about emotions and the belief systems that underlie them? Are emotions matters of self-deception as byproducts of limbic activity – and nothing more?

 

The Intelligence of Emotions, Contd…

imageThroughout my studies, I have discovered interesting threads of belief woven throughout research seeking to define the nature of emotions. For example, a neurological perspective of emotions provides universal insights on the biological components in our brain responsible for the production and experience of feelings. In contrast, a social sciences perspective can help us understand unique variants in emotional expression and experience within individuals and across cultures. My question is, how accurate are these divergent theories about emotions and the belief systems that underlie them? Are emotions matters of self-deception as byproducts of limbic activity – and nothing more?


 

Feelings about Feelings

CIMG5050 (2)ee…Defined as an ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, empathy is a culturally relevant concept. Traditional perspectives of empathy are self-limiting, based on a perspective that is largely empirical and individualistic in orientation. In contrast, culturally inclusive empathy is a useful dynamic perspective that requires two seemingly divergent viewpoints…

 

Stolen Watermelons Taste Better…

imageLast week, the professor for my internship class began our weekly meeting with the following statement: “nothing tastes better than a stolen watermelon.”…Noting the perplexed looks on our faces, he offered an explanation. We were treated to a short story about a boy who steals a watermelon, noticing the ones he steals are much “sweeter”. The obvious moral to his story: perception often influences our experiences than the event itself. The question he then asked is: why does stolen watermelon taste better?? The unexpected delight of enjoying ill-gotten booty, is what increased the boys pleasure of the watermelon….

 

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